Friday, May 26, 2017

New Video: T-Classic – I Want You

New Video: T-Classic – I Want You

Here is the Visuals for the highly anticipated video of “I Want You” by T-classic.
After the successful release of his smash single titled “I Want You” which is still very trending on various music platform.
MixNaija Entertainment Presents the official video for “I Want You” song by T-classic , Which was produced by KillerTunes.
Shot and directed in Lagos by Director K.
Follow on all social platforms to stay updated – @Tclassic_MNE @MixNaija_Ent.
Audio Download

Banky Dedicates New Song ''Heaven'' To Adesua Etomi

Banky Dedicates New Song ''Heaven'' To Adesua Etomi


Banky W is out again with another lovely tune “Heaven” this time dedicated to his heartthrob, Adesua Etomi. The Chris Cubeta produced track is off the coming “Songs About U” EP and was written by Banky himself. Announcing the release on his Instagram page, he said:
Heaven (Susu’s Song).. now playing on YouTube.
Off the #SongsAboutU album –
#Iwrotethisonewhen I graduated from the friend zone and was tryna enter the forever zone. Lol. Ugh.
Listen to “Heaven” below:

 
New Video: Kiss Daniel – Sofa

New Video: Kiss Daniel – Sofa


G-Worldwide Entertainment pop-superstar and multiple awards winner Kiss Daniel is here again with the video to his recently released banger single “SOFA“.

After the much anticipated released of his latest single “SOFA” Kiss Daniel drops the visuals for the track, employing the directorial assistance of Clarence Peters to deliver a clean, well-styled video.
SOFA since its release has helped to sate the appetite of Kiss Daniel’s fans who have been clamouring for new music from the artiste and the visuals for the track is expected to further popularize the song globally.

Comedy- Confesions (With Pastor Muchroom) S01E03- "Bastard Mama"

Comedy- Confesions (With Pastor Muchroom) S01E03- "Bastard Mama"


Pastor Muchroom comes under the fire of a Celebrity’s Baby Mama in episode 3 titled “Bastard Mama”. Things are about to get crazy at pastor muchroom’s and hopefully he has a solution to the mouth opening mess.

Hilarious Pastor Muchroom is a comic priest/pastor and actor who listens to confessions of celebrities, politicians,students, militants, couples, runs girls and more. The videos are always outrageously hilarious and titled CONFESSIONS.
Ivie Omoregie: Government Officials & Their Families Must Not Die In Nigerian Hospitals… Just The Masses

Ivie Omoregie: Government Officials & Their Families Must Not Die In Nigerian Hospitals… Just The Masses



By Ivie Omoregie


Sometime last year I wrote a brief article on the issue of getting medical attention abroad, and to my surprise it got a lot of mixed opinions.

It was something I felt strongly about; some people called it “a simplistic approach to the intricate problems of the nation”. But I firmly believe that sometimes when you keep things stupidly simple, a lot of unnecessary bureaucracy is avoided. And even if the change is not as radical as intended, any kind of positive change must surely be better than what we have now.

For many decades, we have seen State Governors and Presidents not having stepped foot into hospitals or schools for which they are directly responsible. Fundamentally, I cannot understand why people who are vicariously liable for the state of the nation’s health and educational institutions, are not mandated to make proper use of same.

At one point I even reached out to a Senator loved by many, because of the “common sense” he seemingly displays in difficult situations. I actually pitched the idea to him, thinking maybe he would empathize with the general population and jump on board. To my surprise his response to me was:
No, no, no that cannot work…. DO YOU WANT MY WIFE TO DIE

When he said this, I was speechless and immediately thought of all the mothers who continue to die like chickens because of inadequate and sub-standard health care.
I write this article amid claims that President Muhammadu Buhari is dead, having travelled to the UK to seek further medical treatment for an undisclosed ailment.

Some weeks ago Mrs. Aisha Buhari took to her Twitter handle to announce, “his health is not as bad as being perceived”. From this statement the lawyer in me could not help but conclude that his health situation is bad… but merely not as bad… as being perceived.

If we can recall, earlier this year Mr. President was away from January 23rd to March 10, now he has taken “indefinite sick leave” and travelled yet again for further treatment. Anyone who has ever been in paid employment knows that “indefinite sick leave” is a serious thing, and if placed in the same situation most structured organizations will swiftly look for a replacement for the said employee.
Unfortunately in a country where elected officials travel abroad for influenza, it is now difficult to know who is travelling for an ailment that is life threatening and who is travelling for a general health check up.

Also it is quite scary to think that in a country with such talented medical doctors and with money not being an issue, Mr. President could not find a health professional amongst the nation’s 180 million population to care for him.

I am not even saying he must use existing facilities; he has the power and financial capabilities to transform any of the nation’s existing facilities, into a world class organization in the blink of an eye, bringing in the best practitioners and equipment (at the same time training and transferring knowledge to local practitioners)… yet he chooses to take his money to enrich foreign institutions.
Many people have compared our current situation to the when Yaradua was “sick” and the country was being run by unknown persons, for quite some time. If Mr. President had been treated in Abuja National Hospital, it would be easier for interested persons to decipher the true state of his condition, obviously not in detail, but at least to know whether the man was dead or alive.

So once again I cannot help but ponder…

“How different would Nigeria be right now… if all elected officials, and their immediate families, were mandated to receive medical care and undergrad education in Nigeria? Just like the average Nigerian citizen”.

About Ivie Omoregie

Ivie is an Energy and Project Finance lawyer with one of West Africa's highest ranking law firms. Qualified to Practice and with several years working experience in England and Nigeria, Ivie has a keen interest in projects and transactions within the Sub Saharan African region. Ivie is also an active member of the Nigerian Bar Association as well as an avid woman's and children's rights promoter. 

Nigerian Couple Delivers Sextuplets After Waiting For 17 Years

Nigerian Couple Delivers Sextuplets After Waiting For 17 Years



A Nigerian couple Adeboye and Ajibola Taiwo has delivered sextuplets at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center after waiting 17 years.
According to the university, the babies ranged in weight from 1 pound, 10 ounces to 2 pounds, 15 ounces. All six are doing well and continue to thrive in the Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU neonatal intensive care unit.

In Novemeber 2016, the couple were overcome with joy when they saw four heartbeats at their first ultrasound. When they arrived VCU Medical Centre wo months later, they discovered they were expecting twins.

“I was excited. For the very first time we were expecting,” Adeboye said.

A 40-man medical team which included experts from maternal-fetal medicine, labor and delivery, nursing, anesthesia, respiratory, neonatal medicine, social work, nutrition, cardiology and chaplain services, helped to deliver the babies in the morning of May 11, 2017.

Adeboye said everyone performed beyond his expectations from the time they arrived at VCU Medical Center.

“The medical team is excellent in medicine and hospitality,” he said. “We are far from home but the medical team is our family. That is what got us this far.”

Ajibola was discharged from the hospital May 18. She and her husband actively participate in the sextuplets’ care in the NICU.

Ajibola said: “I hope for the smallest of my six children to grow up and say ‘I was so small, and look at me now’. I want my kids [to] come back to VCU to study and learn to care for others with the same people who cared for me and my family.”
 
Photo Credit: VCU
Judith Audu,Belinda Effah & More Star In Uduak Isong’s Film ‘Cash Daddy’

Judith Audu,Belinda Effah & More Star In Uduak Isong’s Film ‘Cash Daddy’



A young pretty lady is out of a job and has a huge hospital bill to pay, she then comes across a man that is totally out of her league and decides to play him for a fool. Does she eventually fall in love with this guy or was it all just a fantasy?

Cash Daddy, an Uduak Isong Oguamanam production features Judith Audu, Belinda Effah, Uche Odoputa, Nsikan Isaac and a host of many others.

Watch!

Top 5 Fashion Fails Stylish Women Never Make

Top 5 Fashion Fails Stylish Women Never Make


Women are very conscious of their appearance. This is why they can take all the time in the world to look good. However, your effort to slay may be futile because of some avoidable fashion flaws you make. So, instead of looking stylish and young; you appear haggard and older. You may not know but your friends will tell you and you won't get that disarming gaze from men. You don't have to worry because we will disclose fashion fails stylish women will never make.
Too tight or too loose
The best dress anyone can wear must be fitted. You won't be worried about your cloth giving way which can be quite embarrassing or it being too big.
Staying neutral
You may not fancy makeup but leaving your face neutral can age you or make you appear less stylish. You can use a bit of powder or lipstick just to pump up your face. But do not go overboard with your makeup,
Wearing dull colours
Try to avoid wearing black, grey or pale coloured dresses. Definitely, dull coloured clothes make your look very boring and give the appearance and impression that you are really exhausted and tired.
Choosing the wrong shoes
If you want your entire appearance to blend perfectly, you should wear the correct footwear for the right occasions Really, your outfit deserves an awesome pair of shoes. Wearing flip-flops or running shoes with everyday clothing can make you look mature while stilettoes can make you appear younger. However, before you wear any shoe, consider comfort. If you can't wear heels, please avoid it.
The wrong bra size
You may not realise it, but adorning the wrong size of bra is not chic. Hence, if you are shopping in Lagos for bras, ensure that you get the appropriate size. Also, be certain to find the right band and cup size.

5 Reasons Why Nigerians Love Ramadan

5 Reasons Why Nigerians Love Ramadan


 For the next 29 or 30 days, Muslim faithful in Nigeria and in different parts of the world will abstain from food and drink from dawn to dusk. Ramadan is one of the key tenets or pillars of the religion and many Nigerians can wait for it to start. we share reasons why Nigerians love fasting.
Free food
There is so much to eat and drink during fasting especially when it is time to break the fast. Many mosques dish out free food that even non-Muslims come around to eat.
Save more
Since you will spend less, there is every likelihood that you will save more when compared to the days you are not fasting.
No flirty eyes 
This is for men especially. They are encouraged to lower their gaze and be more conscious of what they look at. This is because lusting over a woman and almost undressing her with their eyes may render their fast null and void.
Less smoking and drinking
Muslim customers who drink and smoke will not patronise bars for the next month. It is an opportunity for them to quit these habits that are not permissible in the religion. Regardless, some people cannot resist the temptation as they go in the evenings after fast to take a whiff.
They are more spiritual
It is during Ramadan you find people who do not pray nor open their Qu'ran performing these acts of worship. They discover their spirituality.


 “Game Of Thrones” Star Kit Harington Covers Latest Issue Of Esquire Magazine

“Game Of Thrones” Star Kit Harington Covers Latest Issue Of Esquire Magazine



Kit Harington is the face of television’s most obsessed-over show. His hair alone has more fans than most fans than most actors. But as Game of Thrones enters its second-to-last season, Harington faces a dilemma: To enter the next phase of his career, must he leave Jon Snow behind?”, Esquire Magazine wrote.

Game of Thrones star, Kit Harington (who plays Jon Snow) is looking so sexy in the cover shoot for Esquire‘s June/July 2017 story.

Here’s what the 30-year-old star had to share with the magazine:

On feeling uncertain about the rest of his career after Game of Thrones:
“Thrones nicely bookended my twenties, but I’m thirty now. Maybe I can reinvent myself and get away from an image that’s so synonymous with Thrones. But maybe this was the role I was always meant to play and that was it.”

On what he plans to do post-Thrones:
“I don’t really aim to get into that next big Oscar film. That’s not really my route….[I] might do a comedy next….I’ll enjoy the madness quieting a bit. I’d like a few years of relative obscurity.”

Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss on why Harington works for the part:
“He just had the look. The brooding intensity; the physical grace; the chip-on-the-shoulder quality that we always associate with extraordinarily short people.” (Kit is five-foot-six.)



Catch the full interview on Esquire magazine here.
4 Reasons Why Ladies Block Their 'Last Seen' On Whatsapp

4 Reasons Why Ladies Block Their 'Last Seen' On Whatsapp


Whatsapp is a popular messaging app owned by Facebook. It has helped to a very large extent in bridging the communication gap among friends and persons who are dating. This said you must have observed that many girls block their last seen on the messaging platform. Have you ever wondered why? Well, we share reasons why ladies block their last seen.
To prevent fights
This is perhaps the main reason why girls block their WhatsApp last seen. They want to prevent fights with their boyfriends who have become detectives and make all sorts of assumptions, which are usually incorrect, based on the last seen. Hence, they prefer to block it.
She may not be interested in chatting with you
If you are pestering her and she is not interested, she may block her last seen. Perhaps, if you do not know the last time she was online, you will give up and move on. If you continue messaging her, she will not respond.
To stop unnecessary questions
Why didn't you respond immediately? I saw you online. So, to prevent this and other types of questions, she prefers to block it. At least, if you do not see it, you won't question her.
She does not want you to know the last time she was online
Yes, some girls just do because they do not want you to see the last time they were online.

“Why I’m Focusing On Educating The Next Generation” - Funke Akindele-Bello On CNN’s African Voices

“Why I’m Focusing On Educating The Next Generation” - Funke Akindele-Bello On CNN’s African Voices




This week on CNN’s ‘African Voices’, Nigerian actress Funke Akindele talks through her career and why she’s focusing on the next generation of actors.

One of Nollywood’s biggest stars, Akindele has appeared in countless films and some of the biggest sitcoms in Nigeria. Despite starting acting as a young adult, ‘African Voices’ hears how she started out on a very different career path.

When Akindele was a child, her parents had differing opinions when it came to her acting dreams, as she tells CNN: “Growing up was fun for me having the support of my mum, she believed so much in my talent, though my dad never wanted me to be an actor – he wanted me to be a lawyer.”


‘African Voices’ hears how she compromised and agreed to study for a degree, eventually graduating in law. Following this, Akindele began auditioning for roles and had her big break when she was cast in one of the biggest sitcoms in Lagos, called ‘I Need To Know’.

Akindele describes the time: “When I started ‘I Need To Know’, I never thought I would be this celebrated. I was 20 years old then. When I shot the pilot I just wanted to do it, I wanted to showcase my God-given talent… I remember the director telling me I was overacting because I was excited about it.”

Akindele is best known for her portrayal of Jenifa, and she explains why the character has continued to appeal to audiences: “Jenifa is witty, she’s crazy, she’s a go getter, she doesn’t want to take no for an answer and I think I have that – I don’t want to take no for an answer.”

CNN hears that Akindele’s success as Jenifa led her to establish her own production company, Scene One Productions, as well as bringing many accolades, with her series receiving four awards since 2015.

Reflecting on this success Akindele tells the programme: “All I can say is I’m grateful, it’s not easy for you to work hard and people appreciate you.”

Now working on a new TV drama examining the music industry in Nigeria, called ‘Industreet’, Akindele has also founded ‘Jenifa’s Foundation’.

Explaining the programme’s work, she tells CNN: “We reach out to young people, we empower them. We help them acquire skills, we help them discover their special gift, their talent in acting and music and dance.”

When asked what her advice would be for upcoming actors and performers in Nigeria, Akindele tells the programme: “Stay focused. When you know what you want for yourself, when you are focused, you will get there.”
Senate Passes Petroleum Industry Bill after 17 Years

Senate Passes Petroleum Industry Bill after 17 Years


The Senate on Thursday passed the much anticipated Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) after 17 year of consideration: The bill has been passed as the Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB).
The Bill which has gone through 5 sessions of the National Assembly beginning from the 4th Assembly which was inaugurated in 1999 under President Olusegun Obasanjo.

Attempt to pass the bill by the 7th Senate presided over by Senator David Mark met with a lot of controversy and rejection of certain clauses in the bill which forced the Senate then to drop the bill at the point of passage.

However, the passage of the Bill by the 8th Senate followed the submission of report by Joint Committee on Gas: Petroleum (Upstream) and Petroleum (Downstream) chaired by Senator Tayo Alasoadura.

After a clause-by-clause consideration, with few amendments, the Senate approved the bill which promises to change the way things are done in the oil sector.
The bill seeks to open up the sector to more and better business opportunities, make the sector more transparent and ensure better accountability of revenue derived from oil.

If the bill scales through assent by the President, it will restructure the Nigeria National Petroleum Cooperation (NNPC)Department for Petroleum Resources (DPR) and also create new agencies with more responsibilities.

The President of the Senate in his remark congratulated members of the upper legislative chamber for a job well done.

“I congratulate the 8th Senate with the passage of this landmark bill which has not been passed for many years,” he said.
Recall that upon inauguration of the 8th Senate, President of the Senate had promised to, among other things, deliver the Petroleum Industry Bill as well as make laws that will better the lot of Nigerian businesses.

Watch the moment it was passed!


Gunmen Kidnap 6 Students In Lagos

Gunmen Kidnap 6 Students In Lagos


Unknown gunmen have abducted six students of Igbonla Model College, Epe, Lagos. This is coming after four students and two staff were kidnapped in October 2016.

The gunmen entered the school at about 6AM on Thursday after pulling down the fence. They headed for the boys’ hostel and took ten Senior Secondary School students.

PUNCH reports that four of the pupils were later released after the gunmen profiled their parents’ details.
The gunmen were said to have shot into the air at about 8PM on Wednesday but retreated after police officers and soldiers returned fire.

The kidnapped students were identified as Peter Jonah, Isiaq Rahmon, Adebayo George, Judah Agbausi, Pelumi Philips and Farouq Yusuf.

One of the students said: “A friend saw two of them through the window and rushed to tell me that kidnappers had come again. Immediately we raised the alarm, they entered into our hostel, broke the doors and started dragged some pupils out. I hid in the bathroom.”

Another student added: “Two of them broke down our doors and told us to lie down. They didn’t use masks and one of them wore a police uniform. They asked if we had phones, but we said no. After picking some pupils, they packed some of our belongings, including sandals. Isiaq (Rahmon) resisted following them until they slapped him. While we were doing our homework on Wednesday, they shot into the air, but our teachers told us not to panic. They left because policemen and military men were on the ground.”

“When they came, they were shooting. I jumped from my sickbed and hid under the bed. Everybody was scared,” a Junior Secondary School student said.

The gunmen were said to have written the school earlier in the week that they were coming.
Isiaq’s father Maruf Rahmon, said: “I have three children here; Isiaq is one of them. The school authorities had a meeting with us this afternoon (Thursday). We were told at the meeting that the kidnappers had written the school three days ago that they were coming. But they didn’t inform parents. I would have come to pick my children.”

Distraught Ikamat appealed to the government to ensure the release of the pupils on time.
Another affected parent, Isiaq Yusuf, said: “I am sad. Faruq (Yusuf) is in SSS1. I want to see my son. The school authorities are telling us to be patient, but a child is not a goat.”

One Riskat Odunukan, whose child, Jubril was one of those released said:
There should be total demolition and reconstruction of the fence and it should be high. Bushes in the school’s surroundings should be cleared and there should be a police post around the creeks with Armoured Personnel Carriers.

Jubril said those kidnappers asked him about his parents’ details and he told them that his father was late. He said they also asked if he knew my phone number, but he said no and they asked him to go.
The school did not call us; we read the news on the parents’ platform. I thought I was daydreaming. I called some teachers to confirm, but their lines did not go through.

When the last year incident happened, we advised the school to mount Closed Circuit  Television Cameras and clear the bushes. Nothing has been done. The so called tricycles they bought for the school security men are not being used to patrol the surroundings. The kidnappers capitalised on those lapses.

Another parent Amirat Alamorieda said: “The kidnappers came when military men guarding the school had gone. They took 10 pupils, but released four after profiling them. I think they took away those whose parents are rich.”

The Lagos State Police Command has said that it had commenced operations.


Photo Credit: PUNCH

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Watch The Official Trailer For The Whitney Houston ‘Can I Be Me’ Documentary

Watch The Official Trailer For The Whitney Houston ‘Can I Be Me’ Documentary


Nick Broomfield’s documentary on late American music icon, Whitney Houston will be in cinemas this June. Titled Whitney ‘Can I Be Me’, follows her rise to fame and all it came with – money, addictions and the struggle to remain her true self.

The documentary starts with the 911 call from the Beverly Hilton to the LAPD in 2012, the day Whitney died in a bathtub after falling asleep with opioids and cocaine in her system. We also find out that the singer overdosed on cocaine in 1995 while working on Waiting to Exhale.

However, there is no mention of Brown’s 2003 arrest where he allegedly assaulted his then-wife.

Watch the official trailer below!
Mercy Aigbe Visits Face Surgeon In The UK

Mercy Aigbe Visits Face Surgeon In The UK



Actress  Mercy Aigbe is currently on a visit to the United Kingdom. The actress is visiting a an oral and maxillofacial surgeon to treat the injuries she sustained when she was allegedly battered by her estranged husband. Sharing photos of her session with the surgeon on her Instagram page, she captioned them:
In the UK  to see an Oral and Maxilloficial Surgeon…..
No woman should go through these much pain, anguish and trauma all in the name of marriage…….
#saynotodomesticviolence
#onlyweakmenhittheirwives
#sharingmyexperience
#pleaseleaveanabusivemarriage
#yourlifematters
#speakout
#conqueror
See another photo below:




Photo Credit: Instagram – @official_mercyaigbe
Mark Zuckerberg Delivers Memorble Speech At Harvard Commencement 2017

Mark Zuckerberg Delivers Memorble Speech At Harvard Commencement 2017




Mark Zuckerberg, founder of social media giant Facebook, today, bagged an honorary degree from Harvard University.

The degree was very important to the 31-year old, who dropped out of the institution in his sophomore year to start the social network.

He shared a photo with his parents and his degree certificate in his hands and captioned it “Mom, I always told you I’d come back and get my degree.”

Zuckerberg, who teared up while delivering the speech, spoke about purpose and why finding your purpose as a millennial isn’t enough. “The challenge for our generation is to create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose. That’s the key to true happiness, and the only way we’ll keep our society moving forward,” Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post.

WATCH the full speech below:



President Faust, Board of Overseers, faculty, alumni, friends, proud parents, members of the ad board, and graduates of the greatest university in the world, I’m honored to be with you today because, let’s face it, you accomplished something I never could. If I get through this speech, it’ll be the first time I actually finish something at Harvard. Class of 2017, congratulations!
I’m an unlikely speaker, not just because I dropped out, but because we’re technically in the same generation. We walked this yard less than a decade apart, studied the same ideas and slept through the same Ec10 lectures. We may have taken different paths to get here, especially if you came all the way from the Quad, but today I want to share what I’ve learned about our generation and the world we’re building together.
But first, the last couple of days have brought back a lot of good memories. How many of you remember exactly what you were doing when you got that email telling you that you got into Harvard? I was playing Civilization and I ran downstairs, got my dad, and for some reason, his reaction was to video me opening the email. That could have been a really sad video. I swear getting into Harvard is still the thing my parents are most proud of me for.
What about your first lecture at Harvard? Mine was Computer Science 121 with the incredible Harry Lewis. I was late so I threw on a t-shirt and didn’t realize until afterwards it was inside out and backwards with my tag sticking out the front. I couldn’t figure out why no one would talk to me – except one guy, KX Jin, he just went with it. We ended up doing our problem sets together, and now he runs a big part of Facebook. And that, Class of 2017, is why you should be nice to people.
But my best memory from Harvard was meeting Priscilla. I had just launched this prank website Facemash, and the ad board wanted to “see me”. Everyone thought I was going to get kicked out. My parents came to help me pack. My friends threw me a going away party. As luck would have it, Priscilla was at that party with her friend. We met in line for the bathroom in the Pfoho Belltower, and in what must be one of the all time romantic lines, I said: “I’m going to get kicked out in three days, so we need to go on a date quickly.” Actually, any of you graduating can use that line.
I didn’t end up getting kicked out – I did that to myself. Priscilla and I started dating. And, you know, that movie made it seem like Facemash was so important to creating Facebook. It wasn’t. But without Facemash I wouldn’t have met Priscilla, and she’s the most important person in my life, so you could say it was the most important thing I built in my time here.
We’ve all started lifelong friendships here, and some of us even families. That’s why I’m so grateful to this place. Thanks, Harvard.
Today I want to talk about purpose. But I’m not here to give you the standard commencement about finding your purpose. We’re millennials. We’ll try to do that instinctively. Instead, I’m here to tell you finding your purpose isn’t enough. The challenge for our generation is creating a world where everyone has a sense of purpose.
One of my favorite stories is when John F Kennedy visited the NASA space center, he saw a janitor carrying a broom and he walked over and asked what he was doing. The janitor responded: “Mr. President, I’m helping put a man on the moon”.
Purpose is that sense that we are part of something bigger than ourselves, that we are needed, that we have something better ahead to work for. Purpose is what creates true happiness.
You’re graduating at a time when this is especially important. When our parents graduated, purpose reliably came from your job, your church, your community. But today, technology and automation are eliminating many jobs. Membership in communities is declining. Many people feel disconnected and depressed, and are trying to fill a void.
As I’ve traveled around, I’ve sat with children in juvenile detention and opioid addicts, who told me their lives could have turned out differently if they just had something to do, an after school program or somewhere to go. I’ve met factory workers who know their old jobs aren’t coming back and are trying to find their place.
To keep our society moving forward, we have a generational challenge — to not only create new jobs, but create a renewed sense of purpose.
I remember the night I launched Facebook from my little dorm in Kirkland House. I went to Noch’s with my friend KX. I remember telling him I was excited to connect the Harvard community, but one day someone would connect the whole world. The thing is, it never even occurred to me that someone might be us. We were just college kids. We didn’t know anything about that. There were all these big technology companies with resources. I just assumed one of them would do it. But this idea was so clear to us – that all people want to connect. So we just kept moving forward, day by day.
I know a lot of you will have your own stories just like this. A change in the world that seems so clear you’re sure someone else will do it. But they won’t. You will.
But it’s not enough to have purpose yourself. You have to create a sense of purpose for others.
I found that out the hard way. You see, my hope was never to build a company, but to make an impact. And as all these people started joining us, I just assumed that’s what they cared about too, so I never explained what I hoped we’d build.
A couple years in, some big companies wanted to buy us. I didn’t want to sell. I wanted to see if we could connect more people. We were building the first News Feed, and I thought if we could just launch this, it could change how we learn about the world.
Nearly everyone else wanted to sell. Without a sense of higher purpose, this was the startup dream come true. It tore our company apart. After one tense argument, an advisor told me if I didn’t agree to sell, I would regret the decision for the rest of my life. Relationships were so frayed that within a year or so every single person on the management team was gone.
That was my hardest time leading Facebook. I believed in what we were doing, but I felt alone. And worse, it was my fault. I wondered if I was just wrong, an imposter, a 22 year-old kid who had no idea how the world worked.
Now, years later, I understand that *is* how things work with no sense of higher purpose. It’s up to us to create it so we can all keep moving forward together.
Today I want to talk about three ways to create a world where everyone has a sense of purpose: by taking on big meaningful projects together, by redefining equality so everyone has the freedom to pursue purpose, and by building community across the world.
First, let’s take on big meaningful projects.
Our generation will have to deal with tens of millions of jobs replaced by automation like self-driving cars and trucks. But we have the potential to do so much more together.
Every generation has its defining works. More than 300,000 people worked to put a man on the moon – including that janitor. Millions of volunteers immunized children around the world against polio. Millions of more people built the Hoover dam and other great projects.
These projects didn’t just provide purpose for the people doing those jobs, they gave our whole country a sense of pride that we could do great things.
Now it’s our turn to do great things. I know, you’re probably thinking: I don’t know how to build a dam, or get a million people involved in anything.
But let me tell you a secret: no one does when they begin. Ideas don’t come out fully formed. They only become clear as you work on them. You just have to get started.
If I had to understand everything about connecting people before I began, I never would have started Facebook.
Movies and pop culture get this all wrong. The idea of a single eureka moment is a dangerous lie. It makes us feel inadequate since we haven’t had ours. It prevents people with seeds of good ideas from getting started. Oh, you know what else movies get wrong about innovation? No one writes math formulas on glass. That’s not a thing.
It’s good to be idealistic. But be prepared to be misunderstood. Anyone working on a big vision will get called crazy, even if you end up right. Anyone working on a complex problem will get blamed for not fully understanding the challenge, even though it’s impossible to know everything upfront. Anyone taking initiative will get criticized for moving too fast, because there’s always someone who wants to slow you down.
In our society, we often don’t do big things because we’re so afraid of making mistakes that we ignore all the things wrong today if we do nothing. The reality is, anything we do will have issues in the future. But that can’t keep us from starting.
So what are we waiting for? It’s time for our generation-defining public works. How about stopping climate change before we destroy the planet and getting millions of people involved manufacturing and installing solar panels? How about curing all diseases and asking volunteers to track their health data and share their genomes? Today we spend 50x more treating people who are sick than we spend finding cures so people don’t get sick in the first place. That makes no sense. We can fix this. How about modernizing democracy so everyone can vote online, and personalizing education so everyone can learn?
These achievements are within our reach. Let’s do them all in a way that gives everyone in our society a role. Let’s do big things, not only to create progress, but to create purpose.
So taking on big meaningful projects is the first thing we can do to create a world where everyone has a sense of purpose.
The second is redefining equality to give everyone the freedom they need to pursue purpose.
Many of our parents had stable jobs throughout their careers. Now we’re all entrepreneurial, whether we’re starting projects or finding or role. And that’s great. Our culture of entrepreneurship is how we create so much progress.
Now, an entrepreneurial culture thrives when it’s easy to try lots of new ideas. Facebook wasn’t the first thing I built. I also built games, chat systems, study tools and music players. I’m not alone. JK Rowling got rejected 12 times before publishing Harry Potter. Even Beyonce had to make hundreds of songs to get Halo. The greatest successes come from having the freedom to fail.
But today, we have a level of wealth inequality that hurts everyone. When you don’t have the freedom to take your idea and turn it into a historic enterprise, we all lose. Right now our society is way over-indexed on rewarding success and we don’t do nearly enough to make it easy for everyone to take lots of shots.
Let’s face it. There is something wrong with our system when I can leave here and make billions of dollars in 10 years while millions of students can’t afford to pay off their loans, let alone start a business.
Look, I know a lot of entrepreneurs, and I don’t know a single person who gave up on starting a business because they might not make enough money. But I know lots of people who haven’t pursued dreams because they didn’t have a cushion to fall back on if they failed.
We all know we don’t succeed just by having a good idea or working hard. We succeed by being lucky too. If I had to support my family growing up instead of having time to code, if I didn’t know I’d be fine if Facebook didn’t work out, I wouldn’t be standing here today. If we’re honest, we all know how much luck we’ve had.
Every generation expands its definition of equality. Previous generations fought for the vote and civil rights. They had the New Deal and Great Society. Now it’s our time to define a new social contract for our generation.
We should have a society that measures progress not just by economic
 metrics like GDP, but by how many of us have a role we find meaningful. We should explore ideas like universal basic income to give everyone a cushion to try new things. We’re going to change jobs many times, so we need affordable childcare to get to work and healthcare that aren’t tied to one company. We’re all going to make mistakes, so we need a society that focuses less on locking us up or stigmatizing us. And as technology keeps changing, we need to focus more on continuous education throughout our lives.
And yes, giving everyone the freedom to pursue purpose isn’t free. People like me should pay for it. Many of you will do well and you should too.
That’s why Priscilla and I started the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and committed our wealth to promoting equal opportunity. These are the values of our generation. It was never a question of if we were going to do this. The only question was when.
Millennials are already one of the most charitable generations in history. In one year, three of four US millennials made a donation and seven out of ten raised money for charity.
But it’s not just about money. You can also give time. I promise you, if you take an hour or two a week — that’s all it takes to give someone a hand, to help them reach their potential.
Maybe you think that’s too much time. I used to. When Priscilla graduated from Harvard she became a teacher, and before she’d do education work with me, she told me I needed to teach a class. I complained: “Well, I’m kind of busy. I’m running this company.” But she insisted, so I taught a middle school program on entrepreneurship at the local Boys and Girls Club.
I taught them lessons on product development and marketing, and they taught me what it’s like feeling targeted for your race and having a family member in prison. I shared stories from my time in school, and they shared their hope of one day going to college too. For five years now, I’ve been having dinner with those kids every month. One of them threw me and Priscilla our first baby shower. And next year they’re going to college. Every one of them. First in their families.
We can all make time to give someone a hand. Let’s give everyone the freedom to pursue their purpose — not only because it’s the right thing to do, but because when more people can turn their dreams into something great, we’re all better for it.
Purpose doesn’t only come from work. The third way we can create a sense of purpose for everyone is by building community. And when our generation says “everyone”, we mean everyone in the world.
Quick show of hands: how many of you are from another country? Now, how many of you are friends with one of these folks? Now we’re talking. We have grown up connected.
In a survey asking millennials around the world what defines our identity, the most popular answer wasn’t nationality, religion or ethnicity, it was “citizen of the world”. That’s a big deal.
Every generation expands the circle of people we consider “one of us”. For us, it now encompasses the entire world.
We understand the great arc of human history bends towards people coming together in ever greater numbers — from tribes to cities to nations — to achieve things we couldn’t on our own.
We get that our greatest opportunities are now global — we can be the generation that ends poverty, that ends disease. We get that our greatest challenges need global responses too — no country can fight climate change alone or prevent pandemics. Progress now requires coming together not just as cities or nations, but also as a global community.
But we live in an unstable time. There are people left behind by globalization across the world. It’s hard to care about people in other places if we don’t feel good about our lives here at home. There’s pressure to turn inwards.
This is the struggle of our time. The forces of freedom, openness and global community against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism. Forces for the flow of knowledge, trade and immigration against those who would slow them down. This is not a battle of nations, it’s a battle of ideas. There are people in every country for global connection and good people against it.
This isn’t going to be decided at the UN either. It’s going to happen at the local level, when enough of us feel a sense of purpose and stability in our own lives that we can open up and start caring about everyone. The best way to do that is to start building local communities right now.
We all get meaning from our communities. Whether our communities are houses or sports teams, churches or music groups, they give us that sense we are part of something bigger, that we are not alone; they give us the strength to expand our horizons.
That’s why it’s so striking that for decades, membership in all kinds of groups has declined as much as one-quarter. That’s a lot of people who now need to find purpose somewhere else.
But I know we can rebuild our communities and start new ones because many of you already are.
I met Agnes Igoye, who’s graduating today. Where are you, Agnes? She spent her childhood navigating conflict zones in Uganda, and now she trains thousands of law enforcement officers to keep communities safe.
I met Kayla Oakley and Niha Jain, graduating today, too. Stand up. Kayla and Niha started a non-profit that connects people suffering from illnesses with people in their communities willing to help.
I met David Razu Aznar, graduating from the Kennedy School today. David, stand up. He’s a former city councilor who successfully led the battle to make Mexico City the first Latin American city to pass marriage equality — even before San Francisco.
This is my story too. A student in a dorm room, connecting one community at a time, and keeping at it until one day we connect the whole world.
Change starts local. Even global changes start small — with people like us. In our generation, the struggle of whether we connect more, whether we achieve our biggest opportunities, comes down to this — your ability to build communities and create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose.
Class of 2017, you are graduating into a world that needs purpose. It’s up to you to create it.
Now, you may be thinking: can I really do this?
Remember when I told you about that class I taught at the Boys and Girls Club? One day after class I was talking to them about college, and one of my top students raised his hand and said he wasn’t sure he could go because he’s undocumented. He didn’t know if they’d let him in.
Last year I took him out to breakfast for his birthday. I wanted to get him a present, so I asked him and he started talking about students he saw struggling and said “You know, I’d really just like a book on social justice.”
I was blown away. Here’s a young guy who has every reason to be cynical. He didn’t know if the country he calls home — the only one he’s known — would deny him his dream of going to college. But he wasn’t feeling sorry for himself. He wasn’t even thinking of himself. He has a greater sense of purpose, and he’s going to bring people along with him.
It says something about our current situation that I can’t even say his name because I don’t want to put him at risk. But if a high school senior who doesn’t know what the future holds can do his part to move the world forward, then we owe it to the world to do our part too.
Before you walk out those gates one last time, as we sit in front of Memorial Church, I am reminded of a prayer, Mi Shebeirach, that I say whenever I face a challenge, that I sing to my daughter thinking about her future when I tuck her into bed. It goes:
“May the source of strength, who blessed the ones before us, help us *find the courage* to make our lives a blessing.”
I hope you find the courage to make your life a blessing.
Congratulations, Class of ’17! Good luck out there.
Photo Credit: Paul Marotta/Getty Images
Magodo Specialist Hospital Releases Statement About A Mother Of Two Who Died In Its Facility

Magodo Specialist Hospital Releases Statement About A Mother Of Two Who Died In Its Facility


Magodo Specialist Hospital has responded to the tragic incident that occurred in their facility on April 30, 2017.

One Chisom Anekwe passed on at the hospital during childbirth.

Following the incident, friends and family demanded that the hospital be investigated and that the federal government ensures that incidents like that do not occur again.
The hospital has said that it couldn’t comment on the matter at the time it occurred because the case was under investigation.

Read the statement signed by Samuel O Isong on behalf of the hospital:

We are deeply saddened by the death of Mrs Chisom Anekwe. We wish to express our sympathy to the family and friends on this unfortunate and tragic incident. We pray that God will comfort them and grant them the fortitude to bear this great loss. We are however compelled to address the postings on the social media which are untrue. The facts have been markedly falsified and distorted. It would appear that deliberate attempts were made to damage the image of the hospital and the integrity of the attending doctors and nurses based on false premises. It has become necessary to state the hospital’s account within the limits of professional ethics in order to give members of the public a balanced perspective. We wish to state that the case is presently under investigation by statutory bodies such as the Nigeria Medical Association (NMA), the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN) and the Lagos State Health Facilities Accreditation and Monitoring Authority (HEFAMA) and as such, the hospital would not want to do anything that would prejudice such investigations. It is also hoped that a post mortem examination would help to unravel the cause of this unfortunate incident.
Mrs Chisom Anekwe was a pleasant and gracious lady who was well liked by staff and other patients. We were delighted when she registered for antenatal care in Magodo Specialist Hospital for her third baby. She had had 2 previous successful deliveries in this hospital in 2012 and 2015 respectively. During the index pregnancy, she developed hypertension at a time when the baby was not yet matured for delivery. Hypertensive diseases (pre-eclampsia) are the leading cause of death associated with pregnancy worldwide. She was offered admission to control and monitor the blood pressure on 26 April 2017 but declined and went home. She later returned on 27 April 2017 because of headache and inability to sleep. She was placed on BP lowering drugs and was regularly seen by doctors and nurses including gynaecologists. At least 3 gynaecologists attended to her individually or jointly during her admission.

She remained stable until the early hours of 30 April 2017 when she complained of sudden severe abdominal pain. It emerged that she did not take the medication prescribed to reduce her blood pressure the previous evening. The nurses and doctors including a gynaecologist came to see and made a diagnosis of placental abruption, a condition in which the placenta is detached from the womb before the onset of labour. Placental abruption is a known complication of hypertension in pregnancy and in this condition, the patient would lose a lot of blood and the baby would suffer from nutrient and oxygen lack and is usually born dead. On assessment, the patient was in shock. Immediate steps were taken to resuscitate her with intravenous drips and oxygen while attempts were made to obtain blood for transfusion. The staff then prepared for emergency caesarean section to try and save the baby. The team including gynaecologist, anaesthetist and paediatrician were called and they attended. But before starting the operation, the doctors needed to confirm that the baby was still alive by listening to the heartbeat. Unfortunately, the baby’s heartbeat was not heard.

This necessitated a change of plan. They decided not to proceed with the operation because the baby was already dead and the operation could be dangerous for the mother in that situation. A further complication of placental abruption is disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) a condition where the blood fails to clot. This could lead to excessive and uncontrollable bleeding during a caesarean operation. This was explained to the husband who gave consent for labour to be induced. Labour was induced and she was monitored throughout. She then had a normal delivery of the baby and placenta following labour induction.

Resuscitation of the patient continued and she was given drips and blood transfusion to replace what she had lost. She was continually monitored by nurses, doctors and gynaecologists. She was never left on her own contrary to the postings on social media. There was initial improvement in her condition, which appeared to be stabilizing. But when it unexpectedly started to deteriorate, it was decided after consultation with the husband to transfer her to another hospital.

The story on social media suggested that the patient fell into labour, called for help and nobody came. This is not true. The claim that the patient fell into labour was contradicted by the same social media post which alleged that labour was induced without the husband’s consent. The patient never fell into labour and when she developed placenta abruption, the doctors and nurses including the gynaecologist attended promptly. For most of the time, 2 gynaecologists jointly attended to her along with other doctors and nurses. The patient was monitored continually during the management of this severe emergency.

The decision not to proceed with caesarean section was taken in the patient’s overall best interest and according to standard medical practice. The theatre was prepared and the team of gynaecologist, anaesthetist, paediatrician and others assembled ready to do the operation. They did not proceed because of consideration of the patient’s overall best interest. Ironically, it would be financially more rewarding for the hospital to do caesarean section rather than offer vaginal delivery. We placed our patient’s interest above any potential financial gain.

The story also claimed that the “doctor sneaked out of the hospital”. This is untrue. Two gynaecologists were jointly attending to the patient and when her condition appeared to be stabilizing, one of them left with a plan to return after a short while. And when he was contacted that the patient’s condition was deteriorating, he immediately made his way back to the hospital and later proceeded to the hospital where the patient was referred to support the family. He left the referral hospital after he was physically assaulted by the patient’s husband.

We care very passionately about the health and lives of our patients. The hospital is well equipped and adequately staffed. The hospital is fully accredited by the relevant statutory authorities. We are very sorrowful about losing this patient. The death of any young person is regrettable and must be guarded against. We have handled many difficult cases successfully in the past and did our best in this situation. But we also are humble to recognize that doctors and nurses may care, it is God that heals and that despite human best effort, death may still occur.   We are greatly distressed and saddened by the death of this young woman who had been our patient for over 5 years and had her 2 babies successfully under our care. Our hearts and prayers are with the family. We pray that God in His infinite mercy will comfort them and grant them the grace and strength to bear this great loss. We pray that the almighty God will take care of the children and the family she has left behind.
Ifeanyi Ubah- Confusion As 2 Judges Give Conflicting Rulings

Ifeanyi Ubah- Confusion As 2 Judges Give Conflicting Rulings

 
 There have been conflicting rulings on whether  the Department of State Services should release the  Managing Director of Capital Oil and Gas Limited, Ifeanyi Ubah  detained since 5 May.
Two Federal courts, in Lagos and Abuja gave different rulings, with the Abuja court asking the DSS to detain Ubah over the theft of N11billion petrol kept by the NNPC in his tank farm in Lagos.
In Lagos, Justice Mohammed Idris gave the DSS a 48 hour ultimatum to either free the businessman or charge him to court.
Idris handed out the ultimatum while delivering judgment in the fundamental rights suit filed by Ubah challenging his incarceration by the DSS and  urging the court to order his release.
The businessman had filed a similar case in Abuja, following a ruling on 10 May giving the DSS the right to detain him as it investigates the theft of NNPC oil.
Justice Yusuf Halilu  dismissed  Ubah’s application praying the court to set aside its earlier order. But the judge sustained its position and further admitted the ex-parte application by DSS asking the court to allow it to keep Ubah until it finishes its investigation.
“Nobody will stop the DSS from doing its work; the court has no power to grant such order by Ubah to release him conditionally or unconditionally.
“The DSS must always know that the rule of law thrive in this country, Ubah’s order was obtained lawfully but is hereby dismissed,’’ Halilu said.
In Lagos, Idris declared   that Ubah’s detention without charge violated his rights and castigated the DSS for lying on oath in a bid to justify Ubah’s illegal detention. The judge also lectured the DSS on the need to respect the human rights of citizens.
DSS had arrested Ubah over alleged “economic sabotage” and “illegal sale of petroleum products stored in his tank farm by the NNPC”.
Justice Idris held that Section 41 of the Constitution and Article 12 of the African Charter guarantees to every Nigerian the right to move freely.
He warned that there would be dire consequences if the government continues to violate human rights.
“In place of widespread culture of impunity, there is need to build a culture of accountability and respect for the rule of law and the Constitution.
“Such culture must be built on the conviction on the part of the leadership of this country, including the judiciary, that democracy cannot be successful if respect for the constitution and human rights is shaky.
“Democracy cannot be successful if the government remains ambivalent about the rule of law and if governmental authorities and powerful individuals are perceived to be above the law.
“In a constitutional democracy as ours, no one, no institution, no agent or agency of government shall be above the law.
“The institutional and procedural bottlenecks to legal enforcement of human rights can create despair in large segments of the population about realising their rights.
“Individuals or groups may then seek alternative means of actualising their rights. Arms struggles and other extra-legal means of resistance often result from the absence of effective legal remedies.
“A democracy must have practical means of securing accountability for human rights violations. We must as a nation ensure that human rights are protected and enforced in real time.
“In the entire circumstances of this case, I hold that the applicants have established the case against the fourth and fifth being the DG of SSS and DSS for the violation of their rights as guaranteed under the constitution.
“Consequently, the following orders are hereby made: An order is hereby made directing the Director-General of DSS and the DSS to, within 48 hours of this judgement of the court in this action, initiate or institute a criminal action against the applicants herein before any court of competent jurisdiction if they have committed any crime against the state.
“An order is hereby made directing the DG of SSS and the DSS to release the first applicant from detention unconditionally if no criminal action is instituted against him within 48 hours of this judgment.
“The first respondent, being the Attorney-General of the Federation, shall ensure strict and due compliance with the judgment of this court. That is the judgment of the court.”
 Justice Idris had earlier dismissed DSS’ and NNPC’s preliminary objections, challenging the jurisdiction of the court .(NAN)
#Biafra50:“Experience Is The Best Teacher For A Fool''- Prof.Osinbajo

#Biafra50:“Experience Is The Best Teacher For A Fool''- Prof.Osinbajo


Professor Yemi Osinbajo earlier today delivered the keynote address at the one-day conference organised to commemorate the 50th year of the Nigerian Civil War. The event was themed: Memory and Nation Building: 50 Years After

The Acting President’s speech was titled “Greater together than apart”. He urged that while we should remain open to conversations that must be had about the past, remaining a single unit is in the best interest of everyone.

Read the full speech below:

“The conveners of this event, the Yar’ Adua Memorial Centre, the Ford Foundation and the Open Society Initiative West Africa, have done us an enormous favour by offering us the platform for this profoundly important conversation. They deserve our deep gratitude for this opportunity for individual and collective introspection.
“Introspection is probably what separates us from beasts. That ability to learn from history is perhaps the greatest defence from the avoidable pain of learning from experience when history is a much gentler and kinder teacher.

“Indeed, the saying: experience is the best teacher, is incomplete, the full statement of that Welsh adage is that “experience is the best teacher for a fool. History is a kinder and gentler teacher”.
“I was ten years old when my friend in primary school then, Emeka, left school one afternoon. He said his parents said they had to go back to East. War was about to start. I never saw Emeka again. My aunty Bunmi was married to a gentleman from Enugu, I cannot recall his name. But I recall the evening when my parents tried to persuade her and her husband not to leave for the East. She did, we never saw her again.

“I recall distinctly how in 1967, passing in front of my home on Ikorodu road almost every hour were trucks carrying passengers and furniture in an endless stream, heading east. Many Igbos who left various parts of Nigeria, left friends, families and businesses, schools and jobs. Like my friend and aunty, some never returned! But many died.

“The reasons for this tragic separation of brothers and sisters were deep and profound. So much has been said and written already about the “why’s and wherefores’’ and that analysis will probably never end.
“This is why I would rather not spend these few minutes on whether there was or was not sufficient justification for secession and the war that followed. The issue is whether the terrible suffering, massive loss of lives, of hopes and fortunes of so many can ever be justified.

“As we reflect on this event today, we must ask ourselves the same question that many who have fought or been victims in civil wars, wars between brothers and sisters ask in moments of reflection….“what if we had spent all the resources, time and sacrifice we put into the war, into trying to forge unity? What if we had decided not to seek to avenge a wrong done to us? What if we had chosen to overcome evil with good?’’

“The truth is that the spilling of blood in dispute is hardly ever worth the losses. Of the fallouts of bitter wars is the anger that can so easily be rekindled by those who for good or ill want to resuscitate the fire. Today, some are suggesting that we must go back to the ethnic nationalities from which Nigeria was formed. They say that secession is the answer to the charges of marginalisation. They argue that separation from the Nigerian State will ultimately result in successful smaller States. They argue eloquently, I might add that Nigeria is a colonial contraption that cannot endure.
“This is also the sum and substance of the agitation for Biafra. The campaign is often bitter and vitriolic and has sometimes degenerated to fatal violence. Brothers and sisters, permit me to differ and to suggest that we’re greater together than apart.

“No country is perfect; around the world, we have seen and continue to see expressions of intra-national discontent. Indeed, not many Nigerians seem to know that the oft-quoted line about Nigeria being a “mere geographical expression” originally applied to Italy. It was the German statesman, Klemens von Metternich, who dismissively summed up Italy as a mere geographical expression exactly a century before Nigeria came into being as a country. From Spain to Belgium to the United Kingdom and even the United States of America, you will find many today who will venture to make similar arguments about their countries. But they have remained together.

“The truth is that many, if not most nations of the world are made up of different peoples and cultures and beliefs and religions, who find themselves thrown together by circumstance. Nations are indeed made up of many nations. The most successful of the nations of the world are those who do not fall into the lure of secession. But who through thick and thin forge unity in diversity.

“Nigeria is no different; we are, not three, but more like three hundred or so ethnic groups within the same geographical space, presented with a great opportunity to combine all our strengths into a nation that is truly – to borrow an expression – more than the sum of its parts.

“Let me say that there is a solid body of research that shows that groups that score high on diversity turn out to be more innovative than less diverse ones. There’s also research showing that companies that place a premium on creating diverse workplaces do better financially than those who do not. This applies to countries just as much as it does to companies. The United States is a great example, bringing together an impressively diverse cast of people together to consistently accomplish world-conquering economic, military and scientific feats.

It is possible in Nigeria as well. Instead of trying to flee into the lazy comfort of homogeneity every time we’re faced with the frustrations of living together as countrymen and women, the more beneficial way for us individually and collectively is actually to apply the effort and the patience to understand one another and to progressively aspire to create one nation bound in freedom, in peace and in unity.

“That, in a sense, should be the Nigerian Dream – the enthusiasm to create a country that provides reasons for its citizens to believe in it, a country that does not discriminate, or marginalise in any way. We are not there yet, but I believe we have a strong chance to advance in that direction. But that will not happen if we allow our frustrations and grievances to transmute into hatred. It will not happen if we see the media – television and radio and print and especially social media – as platforms for the propagation of hateful and divisive rhetoric. No one stands to benefit from a stance like that; we will all emerge as losers.

“Clearly, our strength is in our diversity, that we are greater together than apart. Imagine for a moment that an enterprising young man from Aba had to apply for a visa to travel to Kano to pursue his entrepreneurial dreams, or that a young woman from Abeokuta had to fill immigration forms and await a verdict in order to attend her best friend’s wedding in Umuahia. Nigeria would be a much less colourful, much less interesting space, were that the case. Our frustrations with some who speak a different dialect or belong to a different religion must not drive us to forget many of the same tribe and faith of our adversaries who have shown true affection for us.

“My God-son is Somkele Awa Kalu, his father Awa Kalu, SAN, and I taught at the University of Lagos. My first book was dedicated to Somkele and my two other God-children. Chief Emmanuel Dimike is almost 80, he was my father’s friend and business associate in his sawmills in Lagos. Chief has been like a father. I see him most Sundays, he worships with me at the chapel.

“The individual affections and friendships we forge some even deeper than family ties, must remind us that unity is possible, that brotherhood across tribes and faiths is possible.

“Let me make it clear that I fully believe that Nigerians should exercise to the fullest extent the right to discuss or debate the terms of our existence. Debate and disagreement are fundamental aspects of democracy. We recognise and acknowledge that necessity. And today’s event is along those lines – an opportunity not merely to commemorate the past, but also to dissect and debate it. Let’s ask ourselves tough questions about the path that has led us here, and how we might transform yesterday’s actions into tomorrow’s wisdom.

“Indeed our argument is not and will never be that we should ‘forget the past’, or ‘let bygones be bygones’, as some have suggested. Chinua Achebe repeatedly reminded us of the Igbo saying that: “a man who cannot tell where the rain began to beat him cannot know where he dried his body”. If we lose the past, we will inevitably lose the opportunity to make the best of the present and the future.
“In an interview years ago, the late Dim Chukwuemeka Ojukwu, explaining why he didn’t think a second Biafran War should happen, said: “We should have learnt from that first one, otherwise the deaths would have been to no avail; it would all have been in vain.”

“We should also be careful that we do not focus exclusively on the narratives of division, at the expense of the uplifting and inspiring ones. The same social media that has come under much censure for its propensity to propagate division, has also allowed multitudes of young Nigerians to see more of the sights and sounds of their country than ever before.

“And for every young Nigerian who sees the Internet as an avenue for spewing ethnic hatred, there is another young Nigerian who is falling in love or doing business across ethnic and cultural lines; a young Nigerian who looks back on his or her NYSC year in unfamiliar territory as one of the valued highlights of their lifetime. These stories need to be told as well. They are the stories that remind us that the journey to nationhood is not an event but a process, filled as with life itself with experiences; some bitter, some sweet. The most remarkable attribute of that process is that a succeeding generation does not need to bear the prejudices and failures of the past.

“Every new generation can take a different and more ennobling route than its predecessors. But the greatest responsibility today lies on the leadership of our country. Especially but not only political leadership.

“The promise of our Constitution which we have sworn to uphold is that we would ensure a secure, and safe environment for our people to live, and work in peace, that we would provide just and fair institutions of justice. That we would not permit or encourage discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, beliefs or other parochial considerations. That we would build a nation where no one is oppressed and none is left behind.

“These are the standards to which we must hold our leadership. We must not permit our leaders the easy but dangerous rhetoric of blaming our social and economic conditions on our coming together. It is their duty to give us a vision a pathway to make our unity in diversity even more perfect.”


Credit:Ynaija